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Rutland, City

RUTLAND, CITY, a city and the county seat of Rutland county, Vermont, U.S.A., on Otter creek, about 67 m. S. by E. of Burlington. Pop. (1900) 11,499, of whom 1533 were foreignborn; (1910 census) 13,546. Area, 8J sq. m. It is served by the Delaware & Hudson (being a terminus of one of its branches) and the Rutland (New York Central system) railways. It is pleasantly situated within sight of the Green Mountains. Among its public buildings and institutions are the United States Government Building, the State House of Correction, the Rutland Free Library (1886, with 17,500 volumes in 1908), the H. H. Baxter Memorial Library, a Memorial Hall, the County Court House, the City Hall, and the City Hospital. The famous Rutland marble is quarried in W. Rutland (pop. in 1910, 3427 and Proctor (pop. in 1910, 2871), which were parts of the township of Rutland until 1886. In 1905 the value of the city's factory products was $2,522,856 (28-8% more than in 1900). The township of Rutland was granted by New Hampshire in 1761 to John Murray of Rutland, Massachusetts, and about the same time it was granted (as Fairfield) by New York. No settlement was made until 1770, and in 1772 the place was again granted by New York under the name of Socialborough. From 1784 to 1804 Rutland was one of the capitals of Vermont, and the Capitol, built in 1784, is the second oldest building in the state. The Rutland Herald, one of the oldest newspapers in Vermont still published, was established as a Federalist weekly in 1794 a daily edition first appeared in 1861, and is now Republican. In 1847 the village of Rutland was incorporated, and in 1892 a portion of the township including the village was chartered as a city.

Note - this article incorporates content from Encyclopaedia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, (1910-1911)

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